Labour of Love

27th Sep 2017 - 2nd Dec 2017

Book Tickets

People, Places & Things UK Tour

22nd Sep 2017 - 18th Nov 2017

Book Tickets

This House UK Tour

23rd Feb 2018 - 2nd Jun 2018

Book Tickets

  • Living Online

    Headlong Theatre | July 10, 2015
    The speakers are interviewed on stage. The stage is empty apart from four chairs, on which the speakers are sitting and a table. The is a projection of the title 'The Nether' on a plane grey backdrop. The speakers hold microphones. The shadowy heads of members of the audience can be seen at the bottom of the shot.

    Is the web changing us? How does spending time online affect our brains? Can you spend too much time online? Journalist Madhumita Venkataramanan (Associate Editor of Wired Magazine), BBC Click presenter Spencer Kelly and game designer Holly Gramazio discuss the implications.

  • Online Policing and the Dark Web

    Headlong Theatre | June 19, 2015
    The speakers are interviewed on stage. The stage is empty apart from three chairs, on which the speakers are sitting and a table. The is a projection of the title 'The Nether' on a plane grey backdrop. The speakers hold microphones. The shadowy heads of members of the audience can be seen at the bottom of the shot.

    How do you police the entire internet? And how much of the web do we know about?

    Join Susie Hargreaves (Chief Executive of the Internet Watch Foundation), Jamie Bartlett (Author of The Dark Net) and Michael Takeo Magruder (internationally recognised visual artist) to discuss how our relationship with the web is constantly changing.

    Chaired by Headlong’s Artistic Associate, Sarah Grochala.

  • A Glossary of Terms - The Absence of War

    George Nichols | Jan. 27, 2015

    What was 'The Agency'? What are PMQs? How do party leadership elections work? Find out more about parliament, its history and the people who have walked its halls in our short guide to the terms referenced in David Hare's The Absence of War.

  • 1984 and Contemporary Surveillance

    Headlong in association with the Cultural Institute at King's | Jan. 12, 2015

    People often refer to the idea that we are living in 1984 when talking about contemporary surveillance culture, but to what extent is that a valid observation? How much do contemporary forms of surveillance actually resemble the forms of surveillance that Orwell imagines in 1984? 

    Dr. Btihaj Ajana, Dr. Claudia Aradau and Prof. Alex Callinicos discuss the relationship between Orwell's own experiences in post-war London, his vision of 1984 and our contemporary surveillance society.

    Chaired by Sarah Grochala.

     

  • 1984 Now

    Headlong in association with the Cultural Institute at King's | Nov. 22, 2014

    Saturday 22 November 2014
    1pm – 5pm
    Anatomy Lecture Theatre, King's College London

    Tickets: Free

    People often refer to the idea that we are living in 1984, but to what extent is that a valid observation about contemporary society?

    In 2013, Headlong collaborated with the Cultural Institute’s at King's on a project to explore the relationship between digital technology and live performance. This partnership resulted in the development of an app, 1984 Digital Double, which explores the nature of contemporary surveillance.

    Headlong and the Cultural Institute at King's invite you to join a group of digital experts and innovative artists for a day of platform panels exploring a wide range of questions about digital technology, live performance and surveillance.

    Speakers include: Dr Btihaj Ajana (King’s), Dr Claudia Aradau (King’s), Tony Bunyan (Statewatch), Professor Alex Callinicos (King’s), Robert Delamere (Digital Theatre), Jeremy Herrin (Headlong), Robert Icke (Co-adaptor and co-director of 1984), Professor Tim Jordan (Sussex University), Dawn King (Playwright), Duncan Macmillan (Co-adaptor and co-director of 1984), Dr Dan Mcquillan (Goldsmiths College), Tassos Stevens (Coney), Simon Vans-Colier, Oliver Cole and Spiros Andreou (TOR Project).

  • The Nether Realm

    Michael Takeo Magruder, with Drew Baker and Erik Fleming | July 23, 2014

    The Nether Realm is a living virtual world inspired by Jennifer Haley’s new play, The Nether. The artwork explores the ways in which virtual environments can be the product of our activities in real life and considers the idea that the moral character of these online public spaces is ultimately dependent on how we create and interact with them.

    The realm is linked in real time to the Twitter hashtag #TheNether. Every time the hashtag is used on Twitter, new life is breathed into the world. When the hashtag is not in use the world slowly starts to decay.

    It’s up to you how beautiful or how dark the world becomes.

  • Dr Btihaj Ajana on Privacy

    Headlong and King's Cultural Institute | Oct. 10, 2013

    Dr Btihaj Ajana discusses the importance of privacy in contemporary society and how digital technologies are changing our understanding of what privacy is.

  • Dr Btihaj Ajana on Surveillance

    Headlong and King's Cultural Institute | Sept. 27, 2013

    Dr Btihaj Ajana discusses surveillance in contemporary society and its relationship to the image of the surveillance state imagined by George Orwell in 1984.

  • In Search of China's Riches

    Robin Pharoah | Aug. 12, 2013

    Stephen Campbell Moore as Joe and Claudie Blakley as Tess in Chimerica. Photo: Johan Persson.

     

    In the summer of 2001, I was living in a factory, in a village, in central China. I was in the middle of a two-year stint of fieldwork for my PhD.

    It was hot. So hot in fact, that the factory’s furnaces blazed only during the night, for fear that workers would succumb in the day. Most nights, I lay awake into the small hours, sweating, my senses overloaded by the clangs and flashes from the factory courtyard.

    One morning, I was roused by one of the labourers. He announced that a VIP, Mr. Liu, had driven from the city during the night to collect me. Mr. Liu was a senior regional official who had taken me under his wing. I knew him well and we had become close. In fact, he had taken me out on many trips before, though never perhaps with quite this sense of urgency. I got dressed, washed the sweat out of my eyes with a bottle of drinking water, and went to the factory gates to meet him.

    He looked at my dishevelled frame disapprovingly, then thought better of his critique and smiled: “We are going to do some business. We will eat with some friends.” I knew well what this meant. His driver beckoned me into his shining black car, and off we drove down uneven roads through the pinks and oranges of dawn, to a remote part of the province.

  • A Who's Who of Chimerica

    Choon Ping | July 19, 2013

    Nancy Crane and Sean Gilder in Chimerica. Photo: John Persson.

     

    Find out more about the ficitional and the not-so-ficitional people that feature in Chimerica.