Junkyard

24th Feb 2017 - 29th Apr 2017

Book Tickets

Pygmalion

4th Feb 2017 - 13th May 2017

Book Tickets

This House

23rd Sep 2016 - 25th Feb 2017

Book Tickets

1984

13th Sep 2013 - 29th Oct 2016

Book Tickets

  • Beyond Language

    Rio Matchett | Aug. 11, 2016

    “It’s beyond language.” So speaks ex-clergyman Christopher Roulston in Observe the Sons of Ulster Marching Towards the Somme. For McGuinness, the limitations of language are both restriction and liberation, something to be railed against as much as it is to be manipulated.

  • Gender Trouble

    Sarah Grochala | July 28, 2016

    In her book Gender Trouble, Judith Butler identifies an unsettling problem at the heart of the idea of feminism. Feminism, she argues, imagines the idea of ‘women’ as a common identity that all women share and that unites them all. But where does our idea of what ‘women’ are come from?

  • The Sons of Ulster are still marching towards the Somme

    Jonathan Evershed | July 1, 2016

    “The house has grown cold, the province has grown lonely…The temple of the Lord is ransacked…Dance in this deserted temple of the Lord.”

    As the whistle blew in Thiepval wood at 7:30 am on 1st July 1916, the men of the 36th (Ulster) Division began their march in to no-man’s land under a hail of German bullets. Today, their ghosts are still marching on banners and on gable walls throughout Northern Ireland.

  • Liverpool, Ireland and the Great War

    Frank Shovlin | June 8, 2016

    2016 has been a year of what feels like almost constant commemoration in Ireland as the centenary of the Easter Rising of 1916 is marked in lectures, art exhibitions, television programmes and parades. But we are also in the middle of commemorating the Great War, a war that for a very long time in post-independence Ireland, was a subject of embarrassment rather than remembrance in what the historian R. F. Foster calls “a policy of intentional amnesia”.

  • Movies and Mass Culture

    Sarah Grochala | Nov. 11, 2015

    The American industrialist Henry Ford is famous for inventing the Model T Ford, the world’s first affordable mass produced car. The Model T Ford was not Henry Ford’s most astonishing invention.

    In 1914, Ford shocked the world by announcing that he was raising the rate of pay in his plants to $5 an hour. This more than doubled his workers’ wages. At the same time, Ford decided to limit the number of hours that his workers were allowed to work. Initially, he limited his workers to six eight hour shifts from Monday to Saturday, which he further reduced in 1926 to five eight hour shifts from Monday to Friday. In doing so, Ford invented both the modern conception of the working week and the idea of leisure time.

  • Subjectivity on Stage

    Sarah Grochala | Nov. 4, 2015

    Duncan Macmillan’s People, Places and Things is an unusual play because we see the events of the story subjectively, though the eyes of its main character, Emma. We experience the world as she experiences it. When Emma takes drugs, the lights glow brighter and voices slow down. People seem to become other people. Objects disappear and reappear unexpectedly. When her experience of events becomes fragmented, the action of the play becomes fragmented. We see her world from the inside, as opposed to seeing the reality of the events that she is experiencing from the outside.

  • Understanding Addiction

    Natalia Lawrence | Oct. 7, 2015

    Natalia Lawrence, a senior lecturer of Psychology at Exeter University, lifts the lid on addiction and discusses what goes on inside the mind of an addict.

  • Living Online

    Headlong Theatre | July 10, 2015
    The speakers are interviewed on stage. The stage is empty apart from four chairs, on which the speakers are sitting and a table. The is a projection of the title 'The Nether' on a plane grey backdrop. The speakers hold microphones. The shadowy heads of members of the audience can be seen at the bottom of the shot.

    Is the web changing us? How does spending time online affect our brains? Can you spend too much time online? Journalist Madhumita Venkataramanan (Associate Editor of Wired Magazine), BBC Click presenter Spencer Kelly and game designer Holly Gramazio discuss the implications.

  • The Future of Theatre Design

    Headlong Theatre | June 26, 2015
    The speakers are interviewed on stage. The stage is empty apart from three chairs, on which the speakers are sitting and a table. The is a projection of the title 'The Nether' on a plane grey backdrop. The speakers hold microphones. The shadowy heads of members of the audience can be seen at the bottom of the shot.

    How is technology changing the way that we stage and design a production? What new possibilities might digital technology open up for theatre designers in the future?

    From the Deus Ex Machina of Ancient Greek Theatre to the invention of the electric lantern in the late nineteenth century, technology has had a huge impact on the ways in which we stage a performance. Olivier Award Winning Set Designer Es Devlin (Chimerica, American Psycho, The Nether) and Luke Halls (I Can’t Sing!, Olympic and Paralympic Closing Ceremonies) discuss how digital technology is currently revolutionising the world of theatre design.

    Chaired by The Nether's resident director, Daniel Raggett.

  • Online Policing and the Dark Web

    Headlong Theatre | June 19, 2015
    The speakers are interviewed on stage. The stage is empty apart from three chairs, on which the speakers are sitting and a table. The is a projection of the title 'The Nether' on a plane grey backdrop. The speakers hold microphones. The shadowy heads of members of the audience can be seen at the bottom of the shot.

    How do you police the entire internet? And how much of the web do we know about?

    Join Susie Hargreaves (Chief Executive of the Internet Watch Foundation), Jamie Bartlett (Author of The Dark Net) and Michael Takeo Magruder (internationally recognised visual artist) to discuss how our relationship with the web is constantly changing.

    Chaired by Headlong’s Artistic Associate, Sarah Grochala.